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Carnival Of Liberty LI

by @ 6:47 am on June 27, 2006. Filed under Blog Carnivals, Carnival Of Liberty

Welcome to the 51st edition of the Carnival of Liberty, a weekly collection of posts about individual liberty hosted primarily by the members of the Life, Liberty & Property Community. This week’s carnival marks a milestone for the Carnival of Liberty, as we’ve come to the end the first year of the Carnival of Liberty’s existence. The very first Carnival of Liberty was hosted, appropriately enough, on July 4th by Brad Warbiany. And, next week, as we officially mark the Carnival of Liberty’s first anniversary and the 230th anniversary of the birth of America, Brad will be hosting once again.

Now, lets get on with the festivities:

First up, this week’s Post of the Week, from Brad Warbiany at The Liberty Papers, compares the United States and European Union Constitutions and writes about what it takes to create a nation:

At the time of the American Constitutional Convention, we had states with largely similar culture, ideals, and goals. The United States Constitution reflects this, setting up a government that each State had general agreement with. In many ways, the United States Constitution tramples on the sovereignty of each individual State, but they did so in a way that the States believed were advantageous to them. The EU has not done so. The EU has taken nations with little common culture, common language, and who each have their own nationalist streak, and tried to form them into a union that doesn?t really do what is required to unite those nations. In honesty, they are forming a treatied alliance, not a Union. And without a solid foundation, they are setting themselves up to fail.

Brad says that this is Part One of a two-part post, so I’m looking forward to Part Two.

Next, the always provacative Francois Tremblay answers Questions from a libertarian war cheerleader. Agree with him or not, Francois is as thought-provoking as always.

Next, Peter Porcupine writes about the latest ridiculous measures coming from the food police, this time in the state of Massachusettes. They’re going after Marshmellow Fluff people, this means war.

At Homeland Stupidity, Michael Hampton writes about a propanganda film from the 1940s that still rings true today.

Next, Mondo QT writes about the impact that government intervention has had on the real estate market.

Speaking of government intervention, Dan Melson takes a look at what’s really going on in the ongoing debate over Net Neutrality.

Ladies and Gentlemen, both sides in the net neutrality debate are engaging in rent seeking behavior. The content providers want to use the wires at for free. The telephone and internet companies want to skim some fees off them.

And they both want to use the government to get what they want.

And while we’re on things Washington-related, RG Combs tells us why we need to write our Congressperson

In the next few days, Reps. Maurice Hinchey (D-NY) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) will once again introduce an important amendment to the Science, State, and Justice spending bill. The Hinchey-Rohrabacher Amendment would prohibit the Justice Department from federally prosecuting medical marijuana patients and caregivers who are in compliance with their state’s medical marijuana law.

Sounds like a good law to me.

Next, NStalker writes about the problem of teenage drivers and what needs to be done to protect the most important right of all, our right to live

Moving overseas, OneManBandwith writes about what it’s like to be a college student in China.

Here students are locked, literally and figuratively, into schools and certain departments based on their national exam scores. Physical handicaps often are a factor in what field you might be allowed to study. As an example: one student told me that mainland regulations forbid him to major in psychology because he was color blind.

Sounds like a metaphor for the country as a whole.

Next Debt Free explains clearly what motivates the terrorists in the Middle East:

These are not driven by poverty and socio-economic status. They are not propelled by a desire to obtain just treatment for them and those of their faith. They are motivated purely by the need to dominate the minds of all of humanity, once again ironic, as it could be argued they are, themselves, inhuman. They have a long history of using violence to both promote their causes and achieve their agendas. This will only cease to exist, if they, themselves, do likewise. We are not going back to life as it was in the tenth century. The Islamofacists need to face that reality and contribute to society, rather than trying to destroy it.

Not likely to happen, I’m sad to say.

Up next, we have a trio of contributions from The London Fog:

First, Mike writes that the drug war has been very successful, for the drug lords:

Criminals love the drug war for driving up the profits on simple plant substances that would otherwise be cheaper than wheat. Their counterparts in the law enforcement business love the drug war for providing a never ending excuse for increasing budgets to accomplish the impossible, and the opportunity to go after easy targets like pot growers instead of tackling more dangerous and difficult problems like the actual violent criminals we are supposedly paying them to pursue in the first place.

We’ve known this for decades and, yet, we keep doing the same stupid stuff again and again.

Next, Mapmaster writes about the impact of uncontrolled litigation on society:

Litigation has become one such popular technique of subverting democracy to enforce moral claims on society. But while litigation has a positive role and a proper place in common law as an instrument of obtaining justice and protecting individual property and liberty, the procedural and conventional restraints that once bound it to those goals have been abandoned.

As an attorney, I can’t say that I disagree.

Finally, Mapmaster has this contribution about the latest bureaucracy to become a threat to our freedom, the United Nations.

And thus we come to the end of this week’s Carnival of Liberty. Be sure to stop by The Unrepentant Individual next week as Brad Warbiany hosts the big first anniversary party.

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10 Responses to “Carnival Of Liberty LI”

  1. Below the Beltway hosts Carnival of Liberty 51

    This week’s edition of the Carnival of Liberty is being hosted at Below the Beltway….

  2. Lonnie says:

    Great job!

    Nihao from South China….

  3. [...] Yep, #51 is up at Below the Beltway. Check it out. Doug has highlighted my post over at The Liberty Papers, which I highly suggest visiting as well. [...]

  4. When the forces of unfreedom came after our homes via eminent
    domain, it was bad enuff. Now our Fluff is being threatened. To
    arms! To arms!

    Nice job on 51.

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  6. Carnival of Liberty LI

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  7. Links and Minifeatures 06 27 Tuesday

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  8. Weekly Roundup of Weekly Roundups

    King of Fools hasn’t put together this week’s Carnival of the Carnivals, and quite possibly never will again, but the show must go on: The Bestofme SymphonyThe Blawg ReviewThe Carnival of the CapitalistsThe Carnival of EducationThe Carnival of the Go…

  9. [...] First, some shameless self-promotion. Last week, Doug highlighted one of of my posts in his presentation of the Carnival. That post was part 1 of 2, and part 2 is here: The Legitimacy of Government. [...]

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